Tag: Invisible Identity

Hu: The Missing Element

Below you can find a version of the talk that I just gave at the European Identity Conference and at Identiverse talking about what I consider to be the missing element in Identity Management. Seems the curse that the A/V gods put on me at last years Cloud Identity Summit survived the conference rebranding, as

Securing Our Biometrics-Based Future

The last few years have seen an uptick in efforts to use biometrics more widely in authentication, most notably driven by the consumerization effect of Apple introducing Touch ID and Face ID. But this could be the (strong) nudge that was needed to push it over the edge. Mastercard just announced that all issuers of

Invisible Identity, or How to Delight People & Secure Users

So I waited patiently for the folks at the Cloud Identity Summit to publish on their Youtube channel the talk I gave earlier this year on Invisible Identity. But it never came. Turns out that a few session recordings got messed up, and unfortunately mine was among them. I sense Paul Madsen’s hand in this.

Privacy in the World of Invisible Identity

In part 1 of my blog post expanding on my Cloud Identity Summit talk on Invisible Identity, I proposed ‘The 4 Core Principles of Invisible Identity‘ that ensure that security and usability stay in a symbiotic partnership for an organization. I believe that adopting the concept of Invisible Identity will be vital to securing people in the

The 4 Core Principles of Invisible Identity

The Cloud Identity Summit is underway here in New Orleans, and it’s off to a great start. The organizers have done a wonderful job again, and with so much great content, the hardest thing is choosing which of the many interesting talks to go to. My talk is already done (it’s oddly liberating to not

Identity at the Nexus of Security and Usability

If you’ve followed my last few blog posts, you may have noticed the topic of usability in security pop up quite a bit. I’ve said in the past that usability issues in security should be considered vulnerabilities, because they create attack vectors in the form of user errors, exploits and workarounds. The idea was captured in this slide I presented